We should keep in mind that Naruto and Sasuke have this grand overarching destiny behind their awesome powers - they’re the reincarnations of the sons of the Sage of the Six Paths, destined to fight and maybe reconcile after sealing their axe crazy Moon Rabbit Demon grandma from another lifetime’s worth of karma.

Sakura doesn’t have that going for her.  She worked for everything she has for skills and, of all of them, her ability to conserve and get the most impact out of minute bits of chakra is unparalleled - not even the so-called goddess of their world can control chakra like her.  She isn’t the reincarnate of anyone special, she has no red string of fate before her, no unfinished karma hovering over her, nope.

So here she is, this clever, ordinary girl, who is standing up there alongside gods and practical demigods and refuses to be cowed.  She heals, she plans and she strikes when the moment presents itself.  Against gods, shoulder to shoulder with destined warriors, she stands and fights on defiantly.

…Shit, man, that’s fucking boss as hell.

Also, you know that next karmic cycle, she’d totally come back too just to make sure those two idiots, Asura and Indra, don’t do anything stupid because honestly they are useless without her to keep them in line, gosh.

5 notes

eowynstwin:

I would like to point out that Sakura’s storyline conveys the best message in the entirety of Naruto

That though you may have been born with nothing going for you other than a little bit of talent, if you work your ass into the ground and cultivate your skills beyond the point everyone expected them to reach and get back up even when you are so tired you can barely stand, then one day

you’ll be able to strike a god

(Source: sakurackerman)

1,493 notes

I am probably going to have to apologize to a friend for putting hilariously terrible modern Greek on Gabrielle’s scroll.

Probably.

teddytrumpet:

gotpasta:

cosbyykidd:

sickomobb:

ghivashels:

colinmorgasms:

what if obama does the ice bucket challenge and nominates queen elizabeth

what if obama actually talks about what’s going on in ferguson

what if obama stopped exterminating the middle eastern population with drones

what if obama lowered my gotdamn tuition

What if everyone gets educated and stops acting like the President can make decisions for the country by themselves

^that one 

131,969 notes

That part in the sketch phase when you can’t find the happy medium between Xena being standard asskicky self and being super territorial overprotective of Gabrielle (who is just being her cutie self).

argh

2 notes

angrynerdyblogger:

Imagine Muggleborns having patronuses that represent something from Muggle culture that they feel protected by. A shy Hufflepuff with a Pikachu patronus. A Slytherin who’s really nervous because of all the stuff in the past and they’re Muggleborn but they cast a patronus and it’s one of the Game of Thrones dragons. A Gryffindor being the talk of the common room because of their Jaeger patronus. A Ravenclaw with a comic obsession finding out their patronus is the Hulk.

35,601 notes

mitimai:

afirethatwillneverburn:

bikiniarmorbattledamage:

capriceandwhimsy:

lycklighypokonder:

this picture is making me really angry
can someone more eloquent than I am please comment with a list of badass female warriors/soldiers in history because i know there have been quite a lot


Tomoe Gozen. 12th Century Japan. Concubine of Minamoto no Yoshinaka, and one of his most famous warriors, called a Demon in Battle and renowned as a swordswoman and archer. Was ordered to flee the final destruction of the Minamoto Clan at the end of the Genpei War by her Lord. While leaving the battlefield, encountered a group of enemy soldiers: rode straight into their formation, pulled their leader out of his saddle, pinned him against her horse, and took his head. She then vanishes from history, never to be heard from again.

Queen Boudicca. Britain, first Century AD. Queen of the Iceni tribe of Celts. After her daughters were raped and she was flogged and humiliated by Roman soldiers, led the Iceni and other tribes of Britain in revolt, leading to the deaths of tens of thousands of Roman soldiers and a near-rout from the British peninsula. Was finally defeated by the Roman general Suetonius, and committed suicide to avoid capture. Is probably the only woman to have her statue in a city she burned to the ground (London).

Princess Zhao Pingyang. 7th Century China. Daughter of Emperor Gaozu. Raised an army on his behalf and led them into battle. Was given full military honors upon her death: one of the only women so honored in Medieval China.
——-
Queen Suryothai, 16th Century Siam (Thailand). Fought in single combat against a Burmese Viceroy, sacrificing herself to save the life of her husband and King.
——-
Aethelflaed of Mercia. 10th Century Britain. Well known for her skills as a tactician and for building many of the castles in Mercia that still stand to this day.
——-
Khawlah bint al-Azwar. 7th Century Arabia, a contemporary of the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh). Once rallied a group of female prisoners into defeating their Byzantine captors using their tent poles. The namesake of the UAE’s first women’s military college.
——-
Finally, let me tell you about what the women were doing while the men were out in some cold, wet field, having their bodies hacked at with swords and axes. They weren’t sitting around a hearth gossiping with their friends. While the men were out fighting, the women were working the fields every day, bringing in the harvests, slaughtering animals, butchering, preserving meat, working their goddamn asses. off. They kept the houses secure. They repaired roofs and spun wool into thread and wove thread into cloth: difficult work today, backbreaking in medieval times. Often times, they did these things while pregnant or raising small children.
They faced disease, starvation, and the constant threat of having some band of raiders come in and rape, pillage, plunder, and slaughter them while their menfolk were off fighting in war. Medieval women, even those who did not fight, were hard, determined, and skilled experts in the arts of survival, farming, weaving, spinning, and motherhood who engaged in backbreaking labor that often killed them at a young age, and they deserve better than to have some adolescent-minded asshole sitting in his warm, comfortable first-world home rant about “feminine privilege.”
So fuck you, original poster. I hope you step on a LEGO.


Did my best to fix it
~Ozzie
You’d think someone who lives so detached from reality would give fantasy artists and writers more credit… 
- wincenworks

the

1548 AC. Siam Queen went to war along side her husband and her kids (one of them was a girl) and died protecting the king. Her daughter fought to protect her body and died on the back of the same elephant.
Around 1765 AC, Myanmar tried to overrun Siam. Most of the towns and villages outside the citadel’s wall were under their rule, but a small village  still stood. The brave villagers tried to fight with everything they had. Sometime, they lured the enemy into the trap by using three women as bait. Sadly, those brave people died when the Myanmar decided to attack them with cannons after had been defeated by the villagers for seven times. 
1785 AC The army of 3,000 tried to invade Siam by march through a small town. In that time, the lord of the land just died by illness. The citadel didn’t even have time to sent new lord to rule the town. To protect their home and country, lady Jun, the widow of the dead lord led her people, which were mostly old people, women and kids (don’t know the exactly number but around 500 or less) to fight against the enemy. Her sister, lady Muk fought along side her. They’re outnumber, by all mean, but they made it up with wit and bravery. In the end, they drove 3,000 of men out of their land.
1826 AC, Back when Lao was Siam’s colony, the lord of Lao rebel against the king of Siam. He attacked a city name Nakhon Ratchasima and herded the people back to  his city. However, during the night, lady Mo and her people tricked the army and drove them back. She lost her sister in the battle.
Anyway, they’re more women who fought and died in wars besides their men and kin. These were only people who left their names in history. 

mitimai:

afirethatwillneverburn:

bikiniarmorbattledamage:

capriceandwhimsy:

lycklighypokonder:

this picture is making me really angry

can someone more eloquent than I am please comment with a list of badass female warriors/soldiers in history because i know there have been quite a lot

Tomoe Gozen. 12th Century Japan. Concubine of Minamoto no Yoshinaka, and one of his most famous warriors, called a Demon in Battle and renowned as a swordswoman and archer. Was ordered to flee the final destruction of the Minamoto Clan at the end of the Genpei War by her Lord. While leaving the battlefield, encountered a group of enemy soldiers: rode straight into their formation, pulled their leader out of his saddle, pinned him against her horse, and took his head. She then vanishes from history, never to be heard from again.

Queen Boudicca. Britain, first Century AD. Queen of the Iceni tribe of Celts. After her daughters were raped and she was flogged and humiliated by Roman soldiers, led the Iceni and other tribes of Britain in revolt, leading to the deaths of tens of thousands of Roman soldiers and a near-rout from the British peninsula. Was finally defeated by the Roman general Suetonius, and committed suicide to avoid capture. Is probably the only woman to have her statue in a city she burned to the ground (London).

Princess Zhao Pingyang. 7th Century China. Daughter of Emperor Gaozu. Raised an army on his behalf and led them into battle. Was given full military honors upon her death: one of the only women so honored in Medieval China.

——-

Queen Suryothai, 16th Century Siam (Thailand). Fought in single combat against a Burmese Viceroy, sacrificing herself to save the life of her husband and King.

——-

Aethelflaed of Mercia. 10th Century Britain. Well known for her skills as a tactician and for building many of the castles in Mercia that still stand to this day.

——-

Khawlah bint al-Azwar. 7th Century Arabia, a contemporary of the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh). Once rallied a group of female prisoners into defeating their Byzantine captors using their tent poles. The namesake of the UAE’s first women’s military college.

——-

Finally, let me tell you about what the women were doing while the men were out in some cold, wet field, having their bodies hacked at with swords and axes. They weren’t sitting around a hearth gossiping with their friends. While the men were out fighting, the women were working the fields every day, bringing in the harvests, slaughtering animals, butchering, preserving meat, working their goddamn asses. off. They kept the houses secure. They repaired roofs and spun wool into thread and wove thread into cloth: difficult work today, backbreaking in medieval times. Often times, they did these things while pregnant or raising small children.

They faced disease, starvation, and the constant threat of having some band of raiders come in and rape, pillage, plunder, and slaughter them while their menfolk were off fighting in war. Medieval women, even those who did not fight, were hard, determined, and skilled experts in the arts of survival, farming, weaving, spinning, and motherhood who engaged in backbreaking labor that often killed them at a young age, and they deserve better than to have some adolescent-minded asshole sitting in his warm, comfortable first-world home rant about “feminine privilege.”

So fuck you, original poster. I hope you step on a LEGO.

Did my best to fix it

~Ozzie

You’d think someone who lives so detached from reality would give fantasy artists and writers more credit… 

- wincenworks

the

1548 AC. Siam Queen went to war along side her husband and her kids (one of them was a girl) and died protecting the king. Her daughter fought to protect her body and died on the back of the same elephant.

Around 1765 AC, Myanmar tried to overrun Siam. Most of the towns and villages outside the citadel’s wall were under their rule, but a small village  still stood. The brave villagers tried to fight with everything they had. Sometime, they lured the enemy into the trap by using three women as bait. Sadly, those brave people died when the Myanmar decided to attack them with cannons after had been defeated by the villagers for seven times. 

1785 AC The army of 3,000 tried to invade Siam by march through a small town. In that time, the lord of the land just died by illness. The citadel didn’t even have time to sent new lord to rule the town. To protect their home and country, lady Jun, the widow of the dead lord led her people, which were mostly old people, women and kids (don’t know the exactly number but around 500 or less) to fight against the enemy. Her sister, lady Muk fought along side her. They’re outnumber, by all mean, but they made it up with wit and bravery. In the end, they drove 3,000 of men out of their land.

1826 AC, Back when Lao was Siam’s colony, the lord of Lao rebel against the king of Siam. He attacked a city name Nakhon Ratchasima and herded the people back to  his city. However, during the night, lady Mo and her people tricked the army and drove them back. She lost her sister in the battle.

Anyway, they’re more women who fought and died in wars besides their men and kin. These were only people who left their names in history. 

(Source: jagargroot)

13,616 notes